Story and Photography by Mark A. Leon

In the coastal town of Charleston, South Carolina where charm and warm Southern etiquette are part of our DNA, it is fitting that we have an aquarium pitted right on the Charleston Harbor that deems the same beauty and respect as the rest of our colony.  Charleston is a place passionate about history, knowledge and marine biology.  From the sharks to the gators, stingrays to starfish, the interest for aquatic life is one that fuels us with ambition, intrigue and desire.  Even for those that have Southern blood through and through, the sighting of a dolphin or sea turtle is one filled with wonder.

As I walked through the floors of the South Carolina Aquarium with a spectacular view of the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge and passing sailboats in the back, I was taken to a time of innocence when I was a little boy and all I wanted to do was see all the colors of the fish, touch them as they swam beneath the water and talk to them hoping through some miracle they would talk back and with the addition of new Lego displays, that feeling of childhood was intensified.

Whether you are five years old or eighty, there is a place for you at the aquarium.  With wide open spaces, a staff that truly loves to teach and awe inspiring moments including an eight foot albino alligator and majestic bald eagle, you will not regret a day of escape and learning.

Come with me as we share a photo expose of a day at the South Carolina Aquarium.

Welcome to Liberty Square

 

 

Stingray

Stingray

 

Spectacular view of the harbor

Spectacular view of the harbor

 

Proud bald eagle loves to pose

Proud bald eagle loves to pose

 

Otters have a soothing waterfall to put them to sleep

Otters have a soothing waterfall to put them to sleep

 

Lego otter

Lego otter

 

Lego frog

Lego frog

 

Alligator

Alligator

 

Gator up close

Gator up close

 

A view poisonous snakes are lurking

A view poisonous snakes are lurking

 

Turtles just trotting along

Turtles just trotting along

 

Lego shark - Great photo opportunity

Lego shark – Great photo opportunity

 

Need information? Go to the Shrimp Shack

Go to the Shrimp Shack to purchase food to feed the outdoor water creatures 

 

Bricks Alive - Where Lego and fish co-exist

Bricks Alive – Where Lego and fish co-exist

 

Nemo and Dory playing in their Lego home

Nemo and Dory playing in their Lego home

 

Love to pet the baby sharks

Love to pet the baby sharks

 

Starfish

Starfish

 

The rich colors and style of the ocean life

The rich colors and style of the ocean life

 

We are all in school to learn

We are all in school to learn

 

Just getting along

Just getting along

 

Lego dolphin - Sorry, no real ones

Lego dolphin – Sorry, no real ones

 

Belly flopping shark

Belly flopping shark

 

Rich blues of the ocean floor

Rich blues of the ocean floor

If you have not visited, it is time to make your way, so round up the family and enjoy a day with the wonders of the water.  If you have already walked the hallowed halls, why not remember why you loved it in the first place.

For locals, the SC Aquarium offers wonderful annual passes/memberships.  Their new membership cards are now being produced with biodegradable material and make for a wonderful gift.

Learn more about the aquarium

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By Mark A. Leon

By Mark A. Leon

Is it possible to spend forty-three years of your life, fifty weeks a year, 86,000 total hours, 8600 plus hours commuting, 1375 hours in travel in a place and be satisfied?  More importantly, can you leave behind a legacy that makes yourself and your family proud of the career you have made?

That was a mouthful to swallow.  Let me take a step back.  How many remember exactly what they did at work yesterday?

Sometimes that is even a hard question.

We work our little butts off making crafts and climbing robes in elementary school and junior high.  Then we fight for a reputation in high school and then start right over again redefining ourselves in college.  If we are lucky, we get to stay a little longer in graduate studies.  Then the big decisions happen.  What do I do next?

What do you like, you ask yourself?

  • Sleeping in
  • Drinking, partying and dancing
  • Hanging with the friends
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • Afternoon naps
  • Road Trips
  • Play Station

Not the most transferable skill sets.  We obviously have a dilemma.  How do we translate current state to future state and still find the same level of happiness we had for the first twenty-two years for the next forty-three?

happy2If there was a simple answer, we wouldn’t have all these blogs and articles on career planning and career management and happiness in the workplace, blah, blah, blah.

Throughout history, we have seen very content and satisfied employees that have had roles ranging from extremely complex to overly simple.  From Thomas Edison to Fred Flintstone, Einstein to Homer Simpson, one constant is true, finding value in your work and balancing it with the true elements of happiness:  Love and family.

Maybe we found our variable.  Love and family.  So, we have two wandering puzzle pieces:  Crazy fun you and responsible consistent you.  Both are running for the hills in opposite directions.  What if….What if, there was a magnetic glue that could push the two together and then hold it tight.  Love and family.

I believe we have solved the greatest mystery of life.

Let’s take five minutes to do a little assignment.

Take these three categories and list five things you love about them and five things you do not love

  • Social / Play Life
  • Work Life
  • Family

Next, find the common elements in all three.

Put those common elements on a piece of paper or index cards with the title “Things that make me happy in my social, work and family life.  What are yours?”

Now mail these cards to five of your closest friends and family members.  No texting, no emailing, no cloud sharing.  Mail!!!!!  Stamps and all.

Add a post it asking them to find five things that make them happy at work, life and family and then share it with five people.

Besides the fact that this is a great way to communicate and a unique and fun exercise, it will open some eyes.

One of the areas so many of us fail at in life is communication.  We hold back and bottle up our feelings in fear of confrontation, loss or disapproval.  This is a passive method of letting others know, there is happiness in all we do and sometimes we need to look to others to harness this.

This is an exercise that can be done at work in a team building session as well.  Don’t rule that out.

Love and family may be the glue, but communication is the fuel that will lead down the road of a lifetime of happiness.

 

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tedx

TEDxCharleston organizers announced the presenter line up for the event scheduled for Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Charleston Music Hall, 37 John Street. Tickets for the event are sold out, but you have a chance to sign up for live streaming of this event.

With a theme of Tipping Point, speakers were chosen to explore the concept that tipping points are happening in our community and globally and how those ideas can ultimately create larger change. Derreck Kayongo, founder of the Global Soap Project, a 2011 CNN Hero and current CEO of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, will emcee the event. He was a featured speaker at TEDxCharleston 2014.

Speakers and performers for the 2016 event include:

  • Don Alderman: An investment and wealth manager by day and Costa Rican farmer by vacation, this inveterate traveler believes responsible tourism can improve lives and reduce suffering in destination communities.
  • Jack Alterman: With refined aperture and clear focus, this Charleston native has been documenting his community for decades, using his lens to capture the dynamics of rootedness, change and gentrification.
  • Marcus Amaker and Quentin Baxter: Percussion and poetry find harmony in the genre-bending geniuses of these two multi-faceted artists.
  • Featured artist Becca Barnet: From intricate drawings to delicate sculptures, Becca explores why humans try to hold on to the fleeting corporeal.
  • Gino Castillo with Abdiel Iriarte: Mixing the rhythms of Cuba with the global reach of jazz, these musicians bring it home.
  • Lia Colabello: A wave-rider turned sports management professional and environmental advocate, this lover of all things aquatic and beach-related understands the danger of our polluted oceans and is looking to shift the tide.
  • Lefford Fate: From Command Chief of the nation’s premier F-16 fighter wing to the wings of overcrowded prison system, this mental health and military professional has some thoughts about how prison can better serve the mentally ill.
  •  Jason Groce: Brace yourself for this improvisational and sketch comedian disguised as a graphic designer and aspiring techie.
  • Kate Jerome: Thinking vertically comes naturally to this publishing exec and children’s book author, especially when it comes to aging and longevity.
  • John LaCour: Tech CEO or spy-in- chief? No matter – this seasoned IT pro knows the tipping point of cybersecurity, or insecurity.
  • Phil Manning: Going paleo is du rigor for this fossil fan, college professor and Fellow of the Explorer’s Club, who works to ensure scientific communication stays hip and relevant.
  • Joseph McGill Jr.: This history and preservation guru knows good ideas come in the dead of night, especially when sleeping in former slave dwellings.
  • Kat Morgan: Advocate, welcomer, organizer, change-agent—this human services and nonprofit veteran thinks it’s time we had a little chat.
  • Eric Morris: From Afghanistan to the Digital Coast, this sensitive guy (aka Remote Sensing Specialist) sees the rising tide of sea level change, and thinks you should have a look.
  • Anuradha Murali with Mrudani School of Performing Arts: Champions of the classical arts of India will bring music, movement, cultural insight and award-winning choreography.
  • Satish Nadig: Cross an improvisational comedian with a transplant surgeon and you get someone who believes nanoparticles are integral to the American Dream.
  • Jackson Silverman: Sixth grade soccer goalie extraordinaire, this young man proves that the adjective “young” is irrelevant when it comes to serving others.
  • Jennie Stephens: This Walterboro native has banked nearly a quarter of a century as a nonprofit leader, and has a few ideas about tipping the resource scale for the under-served.
  • Mary Beth Westmoreland: This global technology strategist envisions a philanthropic ecosystem empowered by good hearts and enriched by good tech.

“Author Malcom Gladwell has defined the ‘tipping point’ as ‘that magic moment when an idea, trend or social behavior crosses a threshold, tips, and spreads like wildfire.’ These speakers and performers are going to dig into that idea. We all look forward to their talks and performances and leaving the event motivated,” said Edith Howle, curator of TEDxCharleston.

Videos of the speakers and performances of previous TEDxCharleston events are available for viewing at www.tedxcharleston.org.

For more information, to schedule an interview, or for high-resolution images, please contact Kira Perdue at pr@tedxcharleston.org.

Sign up for Live Stream

Speaker Bios

live2

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Story and Photography by Mark A. Leon

Story and Photography by Mark A. Leon

We live in a different time, a post 9/11 time, where skepticism and fear play in the back of our minds.  Apps track the activity of your children, cars are made with more safety features than ever before, schools require ID to enter and cyber stalking and bullying is an every day issue.  We live in a different time.  Life wasn’t always that way.  There was a time when kids would go to the malt shop for a shake and fries and flirt playfully across the counter, curfews were understood, not enforced and youth was about candy, crushes and football games.

There was a time, when safety and crime were reference points in a history book and reserved only for the “big city”.  Small town Americe and suburbs led a life of simplicity and comfort.  Every store was your own personal Cheers where everyone knew your name and knew your family.  It was always about community.  Neighbors helping neighbors and everyone had an open door.

In the heart of old Mount Pleasant, there is still such a place.  Since 1938, residents of Mount Pleasant has entered this small intimate family pharmacy for drugs, supplies, toys, advice, soda pop, milkshakes and burgers.  Before school, after school, a mid day snack or a toothache, Pitt Street Pharmacy has been the neighborhood stop for generations.

Today, that small town family friendly appeal remains where you can get coffee for 50 cents, a large milkshake with real ice cream for $3.25 or an old fashioned peanut butter and jelly sandwich for $2.50.  It is a place where the traditional values of medicine and family remain.

Let’s walk together on these checkered tiles and for a moment remember those simpler, safer times when community, strong morals and smiles were they way we lived.

 

Welcome to Pitt Street Pharmacy

Welcome to Pitt Street Pharmacy

 

Would you like a seat at the counter?

Would you like a seat at the counter?

 

Maybe you want to etch the name of your sweetheart in the counter top.

Maybe you want to etch the name of your sweetheart in the counter top.

 

Hope you brought spare change.  You won't need much more.

Hope you brought spare change. You won’t need much more.

 

How about an old fashioned soda pop for $1.25

How about an old fashioned soda pop for $1.25

 

Gumdrops or hard candy to compliment

Gumdrops or hard candy to compliment

 

Maybe jelly beans are more your speed

Maybe jelly beans are more your speed

 

Look at the old Campbell's Soup display

Look at the old Campbell’s Soup display

 

Or the classic burger and fries

Or the classic burger and fries

 

Coca Cola is timeless

Coca Cola is timeless

 

The owners support local teams and businesses but they are very Clemson

The owners support local teams and businesses but they are very Clemson

 

Should pick up school supplies while I am here

Should pick up school supplies while I am here

 

And homemade jam

And homemade jam

 

The simplicity of the drug section.  So easy to find what I need

The simplicity of the drug section. So easy to find what I need

 

Original industrialized ingenuity

Original industrialized ingenuity

 

Wonderful display of old pharmacy memorabilia

Wonderful display of old pharmacy memorabilia

If you have never experienced Pitt Street Pharmacy, come for the milkshake and burger, but stay for the ambiance and experience of it all.

 

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Pictured, from left, are Debbie Rupert, Chase After a Cure board member; Adam White, Chase After a Cure executive director; Whitney Ringler, Chase After a Cure founder; Dr. David Cole, MUSC president; Kathy Cole, Chase After a Cure board member; Matthew Pecoy, Chase After a Cure board member, pediatric oncologist Dr. Jacqueline Kraveka; Chris Hoyle, Chase After a Cure medical research advisory committee; Margaret Marcoe, Chase After a Cure director of marketing; and Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg.

Media Release:  Chase After a Cure presented a check for $100,000 to pediatric
oncologist Dr. Jacqueline Kraveka and her team at the Medical University
of South Carolina Children’s Hospital on Sept. 26. Each year during
Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in September, Chase After a Cure
presents MUSC with a check for money raised over the course of the last
year to support pediatric cancer research. Charleston Mayor John
Tecklenburg also attended, proclaiming September as Childhood Cancer
Awareness Month in the City of Charleston.

Childhood Cancer Awareness Month is a nationwide effort to bring
attention to more than 15,000 children and teenagers diagnosed with
cancer each year. Cancer is the No. 1 cause of disease-related death
among children. Locally, about 70 children are diagnosed with cancer
each year at the Medical University of South Carolina.

Since its founding in 2009, Chase After a Cure has donated more than
half a million dollars to MUSC for research and equipment, specifically
in the area of the very aggressive neuroblastoma.

Chase After a Cure was started in 2009 by Summerville resident Whitney
Ringler and her family after her son, Chase, was given a 30 percent
chance of survival after being diagnosed with Stage 4 neuroblastoma, a
cancer of the nerve tissue of the sympathetic nervous system. Chase
survived this aggressive form of cancer and now his family works
tirelessly on behalf of childhood cancer research.

Chase After a Cure – Official Website

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The 2016 MOJA Arts Festival is just a few days away!  Don’t miss these fantastic literary events!  MOJA offers a variety of arts and cultural programs, including theatre, dance, literary and visual arts, as well as jazz, gospel, reggae, R&B and classical music.
The full program guide for the 2016 MOJA Arts Festival is available now. 
For tickets and information, visit mojafestival.com
Poetry & Storytelling- Quentin Baxter and Marcus Amaker: Jazz & Poetry Show
Monday, October 3 at 6:00pm
City Gallery, 34 Prioleau Street
Admission: Free

Charleston, SC’s first poet laureate, Marcus Amaker, and world-renowned drummer Quentin Baxter were chosen to perform together at this year’s TEDxCharleston on Oct. 19
 at the Charleston Music Hall. Prior to TEDx, they will be will performing for the MOJA festival at the City Gallery on Oct. 3 for free.

Mixing poetry and jazz, Amaker and Baxter will be debuting new songs and also presenting tracks from their 2013 album, The New Foundation. The Oct. 3 show will be recorded live for an upcoming live release. Books, CDs and vinyl will be for sale at the performance.

Poetry & Storytelling with Tammaka Staley
Tuesday, October 4 at 6:00pm
The Southern, 2 Carlson Court
Admission: Free
Tammaka Staley is a performance poet, activist, and teaching artist. A resident of Columbia, South Carolina, she has been writing and performing poetry for 10 years. Tammaka actively works in the community with poetry and youth organizations like OneWord Columbia, the University of South Carolina Upward Bound Program, and Girls Rock Columbia. She was also a sponsor for the SC Community Uplift Foundation Science Rocks benefit concert in 2015. She won the title “Queen of the South” at the 2015 Queen of the South Poetry Slam in April 2015.  She has also performed as a featured artist at the Kennedy Center in the 2016 American College Dance Festival in Washington, DC.  Tammaka strives to empower black communities and use poetry as a tool to give people everywhere something to believe in.
We Are Charleston Panel Discussion
Tuesday, October 4 at 6:00pm
Historic Dock Street Theatre Drawing Room
135 Church Street

Admission: Free
Following the shooting of nine victims at a June 2015 Bible study at Emanuel AME Church, residents of the community and nation recognized the need to examine and learn from the events that led to the tragedy. Through in-depth interviews with the victims’ families, friends and community members, three authors penned We Are Charleston as a way to explore the impact of the shooting, the role of the AME Church and importance of awareness, action and forgiveness. Authors Herb Frazier, Dr. Bernard Edward Powers Jr. and Marjory Wentworth will reflect on their journey and what they uncovered in this deeply emotional book.
Literary Corner with Tayari Jones
Tuesday, October 4 at 7:00pm
Avery Research Center
125 Bull Street

Admission: Free
Author Tayari Jones will read excerpts from her novel, Silver Sparrow, followed by a discussion with the audience.
Set in a middle-class neighborhood in Atlanta in the 1980s, the novel revolves around James Witherspoon’s families- the public one and the secret one. When the daughters from each family meet and form a friendship, only one of them knows they are sisters. It is a relationship destined to explode when secrets are revealed and illusions shattered. As Jones explores the backstories of her rich and flawed characters, she also reveals the joy, and the destruction, they brought to each other’s lives.
At the heart of it all are the two girls whose lives are at stake, and like the best writers, Jones portrays the fragility of her characters with raw authenticity as they seek love, demand attention, and try to imagine themselves as women.

MOJA Arts Festival Official Website

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Ms. Rose’s Fine Food & Cocktails Introduces Live Music Series This Fall

Enjoy live music by local artists on the patio every Friday night at Ms. Rose’s

CharlestonSC – Ms. Rose’s Fine Food & Cocktails is welcoming the new season with the introduction of live local music every Friday night on the patio from 6-8pm. Guests can enjoy Ms. Rose’s southern comfort food favorites and specialty cocktails while listening to live music on the open-air patio. The live music line-up for the Fall includes:

September 30: Corinne Gooden

October 7: TBD

October 14: Keith Duff

October 21: Chris Dodson

October 28: Eric Vaughn

November 4: Chris Crosby

November 11: Corrine Gooden

November 18: Jacob Kendrick

Ms. Rose’s Fine Food & Cocktails is open seven days a week for lunch, dinner and weekend brunch. Ms. Rose’s also features Burger Night every Monday night with any burger and happy hour beer combination for $9, Ramen Night with cocktail specials and house-made ramen every Tuesday and Happy Hour from 4-7pm Monday through Saturday.

For more information about Ms. Rose’s Fine Food & Cocktails and the live music series, please visit MsRoses.com or find them on Facebook at Ms. Rose’s Find Food & Cocktails.

 

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The King Street Marketing Group and Halls Chophouse are pleased to welcome from the Center for Birds of Prey, James Elliott, Executive Director and Founder of the Avian Conservation Center, as our guest speaker Thursday, October 6 at Small Business Lunch at Halls.

Jim Elliot Charleston Aviary At the Center for Birds of Prey, located just north of Mt. Pleasant in Awendaw, you can watch hawks, falcons, owls, eagles, kites and vultures soar above the flying field and gain fascinating insight into their unique adaptations. Every year thousands watch the Birds of Prey fly and swoop in Marion Square during the Southeastern Wildlife Exposition.

The Avian Conservation Center is an umbrella organization for the Center for Birds of Prey, the Avian Medical Center and the South Carolina Oil Spill Treatment Facility.

About our Speaker
Jim Elliot has been a lifelong student of birds. His many years of experience have been significantly effective in his quest to protect avian species and their habitats. Early in his career, he became aware of the need for a professional level of care for injured birds of prey in South Carolina, equipped to sufficiently manage the direct threats to the birds of prey population.

That awareness eventually led Elliott to establish the Charleston Raptor Center in 1991. As the Center grew, Elliott recognized the need to increase public understanding of avian species and the crucial role they play in the environment.

This expanded vision led Elliott and his growing team to broaden the scope and reach of the organization. In 2004, the Avian Conservation Center opened, incorporating The Center for Birds of Prey and the Avian Medical and Oiled Bird Treatment Facility.

Center for Birds of Prey Elliott has participated in a number of professional rehabilitation and veterinary internships and training focused on the ecology, care, housing, and medical care for birds of prey, and has studied and consulted extensively with leading raptor centers both in the United States and abroad including the Rocky Mountain Raptor Program at Colorado State University, the Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota at St. Paul and the National Birds of Prey Centre in the U.K.

Additionally, Elliott has led research initiatives in South Carolina, including the South Carolina Coastal Hawk Migration Study and a long-term American Swallow-tailed Kite survey.

In 2002, he established the Wildlife Toxicity Working Group to investigate secondary barbiturate poisoning of bald eagles in public landfills, and in 2005, he co-founded the Avian Medical and Oiled Bird Treatment Facility in cooperation with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

The Center, now in their 25th year, will commemorate their Silver Anniversary with Wild at Wingswood, an iconic evening celebrating avian science and wildlife conservation, on Saturday, October 15, 2016 at the Center for Birds of Prey.

Among other affiliations, Elliott now serves as a member of the National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association, the International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council, and the Raptor Research Foundation. In 1998, he received the Wildlife Conservation Award given by the South Carolina Wildlife Federation, and in 2001 he received the Environmental Awareness Award given by the Governor of South Carolina. In addition, the Center received the 2006 Award for Excellence in Management given by the South Carolina Association of Nonprofit Organizations. Elliott regularly lectures and consults on relevant avian conservation issues, contributing to the avian programs that he once studied.

Each month, Small Business Lunch at Halls features a distinguished speaker from the business, civic or political arenas upstairs at Halls Chophouse with an imaginative three-course meal prepared by Executive Chef Adam Jakins.

Tickets are $31 per person plus tax and processing fee for the luncheon. Doors open at 11:45 a.m. and lunch is served promptly at noon. Limited seating provides an intimate experience with each speaker.

Click Here to Purchase Tickets

Halls Chophouse is located at 434 King Street in downtown Charleston. Convenient parking is available at the Visitors Center Garage on Ann Street between King and Meeting Streets.

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By Mark A. Leon

“Writing is a form of therapy; sometimes I wonder how all those, who do not write, compose, or paint can manage to escape the madness, the melancholia, the panic fear, which is inherent in a human condition” – Graham Greene

“The greatest healing therapy is friendship and love.” – Hubert H. Humphrey

What is “Text Therapy”?

If you search the truth (aka Urban Dictionary) you will find several self-imposed definitions of the growing phenomenon in our social sphere. Some view it as the consolidation of emotions into a small phrase on Twitter, Facebook or text to a discriminate or non-discriminate audience. The thought of pouring your emotions to faceless millions does sound appealing to some and almost crazy to others.

In a time where social courage is running rampant, it is no surprise that this is a growing trend. We can meet and reject dates without ever meeting them in person via dating sites, dismiss a friendship with one click, share a new relationship to a global community without making one call or expressing sorrow over the loss of a loved one to the masses. Voices are silenced but never have they been so loud.

When was it acceptable to extend the arm of vulnerability in one hundred and forty characters? Is the first thought on our minds after a divorce or break up to tell anyone in front of a computer or smartphone that will listen that it is over, I am a free person and he/she does not know what they are missing? Are we looking for a reaction from the audience that clearly, by being a friend, paid admission to witness this comment? Does the immediacy of the reactions lend a higher weight to how valued you are by your social community? Are we so in need of virtual and immediate comfort that we don’t even take the time to let the situation sink in and accept the normal course of reaction time?

All valid questions that require a much deeper evaluation of the individuals participating in this ritualistic trend. But, if this piece exceeds 800 words, we will lose the core audience and thus eliminate any value that could be served.

I would like to shift gears away from the non-discriminate form of emotional up chuck and move to a targeted approach and what I believe is “Text Therapy”. Using the small sample size of my circle of friends, I have in the past been a shoulder of comfort to some creating the grand illusion of an open ear and voice of rational thought. The acceptance of friends coming to me for advice and consultation is not new in my world. What I have begun to bear witness is the exceedingly increasing use of text therapy sessions where I would receive a long text indicating depression, fear, anxiety, loneliness, heartache and trauma.

My first reaction is to offer phone time as these are not local friends, but rarely is the offer accepted. Without the ability to give a true and sensible response via text, I offer comfort through only a few simple words. Then a few more texts may ensue or silence. I will follow up and often times I get a “I feel a little better” or “I’m ok” but no clear sign of recovery from the drama that began with the first text.

Can this free and immediate consolidated therapy provide any long term help for the distressed. I am not a doctor, but my analysis is no. I sense that the social revolution has not only brought the world closer together but created a “right now” mentality that has corrupted our ability to feel.

I vividly remember the Challenger Disaster, September 11, 2001 and the announcement of the Death of Osama Bin Laden. The first two still leave vivid details in my memory box and lingering emotions for days and years. Bin Laden was very different. First, I found out 30 minutes before the President made the announcement as it was leaked out through various channels and within 5 minutes after the announcement, the bar did a round of free shots, some continued talking about what had transpired, but most of us moved on other subjects of sports, school, dating and life. We have almost turned ourselves into drones who are incapable of feeling for a long period of time.

That is a scary thought. The ability to feel and connect is what makes us human and thus the most intelligent beings on this planet. If we lose that, we are robots, void of emotion and void of feelings of love and compassion.

Let that sink in next time you reach out and request your next immediate text therapy session.

PS – 785 Words

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The Kickin’ Chicken Raises $18,399 for Teachers’ Supply Closet

 

Kickin’ Chicken supports TSC for 5th straight year and surpasses donation goal  

 

Charleston, SC – This month The Kickin’ Chicken presented the Teachers’ Supply Closet with a check totaling $18,399. Teachers’ Supply Closet (TSC) is a Charleston based, nonprofit organization that provides teachers with free school supplies needed for their classrooms that they would otherwise have to purchase out of pocket.

This donation was the direct result of a fundraising initiative by The Kickin’ Chicken during the month of August. Kickin’ Chicken customers were encouraged to purchase paper “chicken heads” to donate either $1, $5 or $10 to the cause. Within a month, the “chicken head” sales raised over $14k and ownership matched the top selling store at $4,301 — bringing the total to $18k+, about $9k more than last year.

“It has been wonderful opportunity to work with The Kickin’ Chicken over these past few years, “said Lynette Duggins Thomas, Executive Director at Teachers’ Supply Closet. “Their generous donation will allow us to purchase crayons, markers, composition books — all the supplies that we need in order to continue to serve the teachers at the 46 schools that we work with in the Tri-County area.

The Kickin’ Chicken invited their top 10 “Chicken Head” sellers to the TSC Golf Tournament at Stono Ferry on Friday, September 16. The Kickin’ Chicken Food Truck was present, serving lunch to tournament participants. While there, Kickin’ Chicken presented the Teachers’ Supply Closet staff and board with the check for $18,399. This is the 5th year that Kickin’ Chicken has directly supported the Teachers’ Supply Closet and the donations generated have grown significantly larger each year.

To learn more about Teachers’ Supply Closet and the Kickin’ Chicken, visit www.teacherssupplycloset.org or www.KickinChicken.com or find them via Facebook at Kickin’ Chicken.

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